Category Archives: violence

The Spread of the Caliphate: The Islamic State (Documentary Video by Vice News)

About

Part one in the video series was originally published on Jun 17, 2014. Below is the information provided on YouTube about the series.

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Part 1

Last week, the extremist militant Sunni group — Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), along with other Sunni militias and former Baathist party members, seized control of large parts of Iraq, including Mosul, the nation’s second largest city.

In many places, the Iraqi army barely put up a flight. Soldiers dropped their weapons and fled, whether because of fear, incompetence, or internal sabotage. Hundreds of thousands of Iraqis have become internally displaced after fleeing the fighting or the potential for potential Iraqi air strikes.

As ISIS and the other groups continued to fight their way to Baghdad, gruesome videos of brutal executions began to surface. Iraqi army units stationed near Baghdad, as well as Shiite militias, have pledged to not give up so easily.

Many say the conflict was brewing for a while, and that ISIS, along with some of the other groups, has had some semblance of control in Sunni areas for quite some time. They point to Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Al-Maliki’s increasingly sectarian polices and crackdowns on Sunnis as having provoked the events of the last week, and fear this could be the start of a devastating civil war.

In the north, Kurdish forces known as the peshmerga have used the opportunity to seize disputed areas, territories that the Kurds long felt belonged to them but the government was hesitant relinquish. An informal border now exists between ISIS dominated areas and Kurdish territory. There has only been sporadic clashing, as neither group seems determined to break the strange detente.

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Part 2

As a coalition of ISIS fighters, Sunni militias, and former Baathists continues to push its way toward Baghdad, the Iraqi army and Shiite militias have fought to slow its progress.

In Mosul, however, ISIS and other Sunni forces now exert total control. Confusion remains about what exactly happened there, and why Iraqi soldiers abandoned their posts so quickly. There is much speculation about the role high-ranking officers in the Iraqi army might have played, and whether or not they were involved in internal sabotage or had advance knowledge of the assault. Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki has already fired a number of high-ranking officers, and ordered one to be court-martialed for desertion.
After fighting broke out, hundreds of thousands of civilians fled Mosul for territory controlled by the Kurdish Regional Government, many Iraqi army deserters among them. A seven-year veteran of the Iraqi army who sought refuge in Erbil agreed to talk to VICE News about what happened on the condition that we withhold his identity.

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Part 3

Up until a week ago, the city of Kirkuk in northern Iraq was one of the most hotly contested areas in the country, with a mishmash of Kurds, Arabs, and Turkomans, who all had strong claims to the land. Now that the Iraqi army has fled and ISIS has been repelled, the Kurds are fully in control, and hope to integrate the city into the Kurdish Regional Government (KRG).

Despite a large Kurdish presence in Kirkuk, this still might not be so easy. The Arab and Turkoman populations have long resisted Kurdish rule, and the large amount of oil nearby — which all of these groups want a fair share of — will only complicate matters further.

The Kurds, however, insist that control over the city is more a matter of dignity. Beginning in the 1960s and continuing throughout Saddam Hussein’s rule, many Kurds in the area were forced off the land during an Arabization process, which sought to change the demographics of the city. Poor Arabs were offered land, houses, and money to move to the city and take over formerly Kurdish lands.

During the 2003 US invasion of Iraq, Kurdish forces and American soldiers took the city from the Baathist party. But the Kurdish forces mostly withdrew, and the city was not annexed to the KRG.

Since then Kirkuk has been under a sort of coalition rule, though it is still considered a disputed territory. Kurds have sought to implement Article 140 of the Iraqi constitution, which would allow the people of Kirkuk to vote on whether or not the city should join the KRG or remain part of Iraq. But this vote has been delayed numerous times.

As recently as 2012, the Iraqi army and the Kurdish fighters, know as Peshmerga, engaged in a standoff that at times seemed like it could break out into conflict. For now though, the Kurds are firmly in control — though south of the city, sporadic attacks continue.

VICE News spoke with Falah Mustafa Bakir, the head of foreign relations for the KRG, who said that the Kurds have no intention of giving up their control of Kirkuk.

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Part 4

As the Kurds move further into Iraq’s disputed territories, not everyone is thrilled. In towns closer to Baghdad with higher Arab populations, like Jalawla and Sadiya, they have encountered fierce resistance from militant Sunni groups. While Kurdish peshmerga forces have been welcomed in many areas, they’ve needed to fight to enter others.

In our fourth dispatch amid the escalating crisis in Iraq, VICE News embedded with the peshmerga as they struggle to maintain control over their land, as tension in Iraq heightens between its main ethnic and religious factions.

We also spoke with a Sunni tribal leader in Kirkuk about the recent Kurdish takeover and the strategic importance of the city, and with Kurdish soldiers about why they volunteered to fight — and how they are successfully fending off advances from ISIS and the Iraqi Shiite military nearby.

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Part 5

Here’s Who Is Fighting in Iraq and Why: http://bit.ly/1yFN1ET

Crisis in Iraq: Kurdish Peshmerga Clash With Advancing ISIS: http://bit.ly/1ye4TGF

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19 people shot in overnight shootings across Chicago

By Peter NickeasTribune reporter9:30 a.m. CDT, August 24, 2012

Nineteen people were shot across the South and West sides from Thursday evening through early Friday morning — 13 of them wounded over a 30-minute period, authorities say.

The overnight shootings peaked between 9:15 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. That’s when eight people, many of them teens, were shot at 79th Street and Essex Avenue about 9:30 p.m.

Then two men were wounded in the Ida B. Wells / Darrow Homes complex at about 9:25 p.m., police said. The men, 27 and 33, were shot in the 600 block of East 37th Street and taken to the University of Chicago Hospitals, police said. The younger man was shot in the head and the other in the right arm, Gaines said.

Around the same time, two other men were wounded in the arms in a drive-by shooting in the 2900 block of West 39th Place in the Brighton Park neighborhood.

About 15 minutes later, a 24-year-old man was shot in the leg and taken to Jackson Park Hospital from the 7200 block of South Jeffery Boulevard, Gaines said. He was treated and released. The man told police he was talking on his phone when he heard a single shot and realized he was wounded.

Earlier Thursday evening, four men were wounded in a shooting in the Little Village neighborhood about 5:20 p.m. Thursday, police said.

They were walking in the 3200 block of South Kedzie Avenue when at least one person inside a vehicle with three others opened fire, police said, hitting the group. Three 19-year-olds and a 22-year-old were wounded.

Just after midnight, a 17-year-old was shot in the back and taken to Stroger Hospital in serious condition, police said. He was walking in the 7100 block of South Vincennes Avenue in the Englewood neighborhood when someone inside a passing car opened fire, police said.

Another 17-year-old was shot after 1:30 a.m. Friday in the 3500 block of West Grenshaw Street in the Homan Square neighborhood. He’s in good condition at Mount Sinai Hospital. Someone walked to him and started shooting, police said.

25 August 2012 – New York City – Shooting near Empire State Building

At approximately 9:00 AM, several people were shot near the Empire State Building. According to a 9:36 AM report in the New York Times:

Several people were shot by a man who was either inside or just outside the Empire State Building shortly after 9 a.m. on Friday, according to the police and the Fire Department. The shooter was killed by the police.

The precise number of people who were shot or their conditions was unknown, but several victims were being treated at the corner of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street.

The shooting caused a major traffic backup in the area with surrounding streets closed.

Interview with Hamas terrorist Ahlam Tamimi

Terrorists come from all religions, races, and nations. The above video is illustrative of the terrorist mindset with regard to bringing harm to their perceived enemy. The elation associated with a successful attack can also be witnessed in documentaries of war and military combat engagement.

Acts of war or terrorism are generally out of desperation when diplomacy has failed. In some cases, the disenfranchised turn to violence because they feel they don’t have a voice or equal influence through normal democratic mechanisms.

Hamas terrorist Ahlam Tamimi was dealt 16 life sentences in Israeli prison before she was released in the Gilad Shalit prisoner exchange deal in October 2011. Tamimi masterminded the Sbarro Restaurant suicide bombing on August 9, 2011 which killed 16 Israelis and wounded 130. Promotion of the above video was viewed by some as propaganda to perpetuate a narrow demonized representation of Muslims.

In Plane Sight – Sept 11 – 911 Conspiracy

If A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words, What Is A Video Worth?

What “In Plane Site” accomplishes that no other video expose’ on September 11th has to date, is it exposes the viewer to a barrage of news clips from a majority of the mainstream news outlets. The official story of that day was told on live TV by reporters, policemen, firefighters, and other on-the-scene eyewitnesses, however, that footage was shown only once on live television broadcasts in the first hours of the attacks and then… it was never repeated. The stories changed, information was enigmatically omitted, and what can only be described as officially prescribed propaganda took the place of indisputable reality.

THE PENTAGON: Some of the most damning evidence surrounding the attack on the Pentagon centers about substantial and incontrovertible video and photographic evidence which insights viewers to ask crucial and essential questions. After all, the laws of physics cannot be suspended or can they?

One question many viewers ask is, “why was America and the rest of the world not shown the video footage and the photographs of the Pentagon, BEFORE the outer wall had collapsed?” Many people do not realize that the outer wall of the Pentagon did not collapse until 20 minutes after the initial impact of what we were told was a Boeing 757.

Upon examining these photographs, one can clearly see a hole, which is only 16 feet in diameter. This begs the question: “How can a Boeing 757 which is over 44 feet in height and 124 feet in width simply disappear without a trace into a hole that is only 16 ft. in diameter? Also, why is there no external damage to the Pentagon where the wings and the tail section would have impacted with the outer wall?
Contrary to the video footage shown to the American public, photographs taken only moments after the impact show no wreckage on the lawn of the Pentagon. Where is the plane? Where are the wings, the tail, the luggage, the seats, the landing gear, and the engines? Most importantly, what happened to the passengers who were aboard that plane?

America remembers the photographs that they were shown of tiny, indiscernible fragments, which were described as pieces of a Boeing 757. Were these fragments of a Boeing 757? Internal photographs of the Pentagon taken by Jocelyn Augustino, a FEMA photographer, do not show engine parts matching the description of a 757’s engine turbofan according to John W. Brown, a spokesperson for Rolls Royce. Both Pratt & Whitney and Rolls Royce manufacture the engines used on these jetliners. The turbofans themselves are approximately 7 feet in diameter. The FEMA photos show what appears to be a single turbofan that is approximately 3 feet in diameter. This better fits the descriptions of eyewitnesses who claim that they saw what could only be described as a commuter plane capable of holding only 8 to 12 passengers. This single piece of evidence also helps support other reports from witnesses such as Lon Rains, editor for “Space News,” who was quoted as saying “I heard a very loud, quick whooshing sound.

I was convinced it was a missile. It came in so fast — it sounded nothing like an airplane.” Don Parkal said, “A bomb had gone off. I could smell the cordite. I knew explosives had been set off somewhere.” Tom Seibert said, “We heard what sounded like a missile.”

Wide-Spread Fear, Panic and Regional Strife – India

The following excerpts are from the New York Times report “Panic Seizes India as a Region’s Strife Radiates” – 17 August 2012, Brajakhal, India.

What began as an isolated communal conflict here in the remote state of Assam, a vicious if obscure fight over land and power between Muslims and the indigenous Bodo tribe, has unexpectedly set off widespread panic among northeastern migrants who had moved to more prosperous cities for a piece of India’s rising affluence.

Last week, the central government started moving to stabilize Assam, where at least 78 people have been killed and more than 300,000 have fled their homes for refugee camps. Then Muslims staged a large, angry protest in Mumbai, the country’s financial capital, on the western coast. A wave of fear began sweeping through the migrant communities after several people from the northeast were beaten up in Pune, a city not far from Mumbai.

… 14,000 homes have been burned. … “If we go back and they attack us again, who will save us?” asked Subla Mushary, 35, who is now living with her two teenage daughters at a camp for Bodos. “I have visited my home. There is nothing left.” [source]